Hello! — I'm Jim Lamiell, Product Manager at The New York Times

---

I specialize in understanding and pursuing product opportunities, guiding day-to-day development toward organizational goals, and measuring success through qualitative and quantitative testing.

 

Discovery

Uncovering the unmet needs of potential customers is the first step in pursuing a product opportunity. I have experience in interviewing users, ideating with teams, and presenting to stakeholders.

Management

Ensuring the organization's goals and user's needs are being met by the product's design and development is essential for success and something I manage on a day-to-day basis.

Lima01.jpg

Testing

Going by gut can be a helpful part of decision-making, but not as the only input. I turn hypotheses into actionable insights through qualitative and quantitative testing with users.

---

Feel free to view some of my work featured on this site, or go here to download a resume, request my portfolio, or contact me.

Making the standard of digital journalism even better

The Article Page has been one of the constant expressions of our reporting since the start of our digital presence (the other being the homepage). Therefore it needed a team that was dedicated to discovering, through testing and informed decision-making, how to gradually improve the template to stay competitive in a quickly changing landscape. Through this focus on the article page template, we aimed to incrementally increase engagement metrics across the board: from how many articles were viewed per visit, to the completion rates of our articles.

The result? Greater optimization of our article-to-article traffic, and insights into what works - and more importantly, what doesn't - in gaining more engagement from our readers.

A handful of the team's experiments can be seen below.

---

Hypothesis: Once a reader is done with the article, should we show the most emailed stories to entice another click, or something more social across Facebook and Twitter, and more importantly real-time?

---

Hypothesis: Are readers who finish an article more likely to go to another article, or share the one they're currently on? What's more valuable to us?

---

Hypothesis: If a persistent bar offering up other stories were always present, even mid-article, would we entice readers who lost interest in another click?

---

To hear more about this project, or others like it, request a portfolio here.

Giving Times photography a new web presence

Photography plays an integral part in how The New York Times reports the news; just ask any number of the award-winning photographers who work in the newsroom. However, the existing Times slideshow experience for desktop and tablets was outdated, no longer fit for readers who demand responsive sites that grow or shrink the image to fit the viewport and make the viewing experience as pleasant as possible. The benefits of improving our slideshows, however, could extend beyond our users: a single template can make production work far simpler, and responsivity opens the door for smarter placement of advertising.

The result? Double the completion rates of our slideshows (vs. the old, unresponsive template) and greater monetization through the improved ad unit.

---

An introductory card to explain and contextualize the slideshow

An individual slideshow card, with image, caption, ad unit, and sharing capabilities

The end of slideshow experience, linking to a related article as well as other slideshows from that section

---

To hear more about this project, or others like it, request a portfolio here.

Reinforcing the power and reach of branded content

Paid Posts are branded stories created for advertisers by the Times internal branding studio, T Brand Studio, and highlighted within our site via “native advertising,” or units that live alongside our reporting. Integrating these units within our article and home pages has always proved to be challenging - how do we make them as impactful as possible without distracting or misleading the reader? - but crucial in gaining the most reach for this branded content. The team therefore undertook a project to address this central question, with the ultimate goal of ensuring the best audience, composed of Times readers and subscribers, for our advertisers.

The result? Paid Posts are now receiving well over the amount of traffic and monthly pageviews needed to make it a viable business for The Times. 

---

Paid Posts featured the Top News section of The New York Times homepage

---

Paid Posts integrated within the top and middle of a Times article page

Paid Posts integrated within the bottom of a Times article page

---

To hear more about this project, or others like it, request a portfolio here.